The Playlist for “A dinosaur toy grows in a glass of water” is now Available

 

 

See the archive playlist and read the exhibition text

The fourth installation in Closet Gallery, “A dinosaur toy grows in a glass of water” is an installation of a photograph selected by the artist, each day growing incrementally until it swells outside the frame.

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Regazzi describes the photograph, “I was with my aunt and my cousin at African Lion Safari–an open air zoo in Southern Ontario–where we came upon a wet, concrete play park on the grounds. I really loved to swim as a child, however I was ill equipped to do so in this instance; I hadn’t any trunks to change into. My aunt suggested I go swimming in my underwear, and so reluctantly I removed my clothes. I was captured, contemplating my predicament, lounging in horror at the sight of my body. I’m not sure it was this way really, but in my head, the kids watching me were laughing, aghast.

This project was live streamed November 20-24, 2017 from 9:30am – 6:30pm ET.

November in Closet Gallery

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For the November showing in Closet Gallery, Montreal artist Lucas Regazzi will share an evolving photo installation called A dinosaur toy grows in a glass of water.

A dinosaur toy grows in a glass of water by Lucas Regazzi
20 – 24 November, 2017

Once a day, over the course of five days, the curator will mount an image on the wall. Its print will grow incrementally, eventually swelling and spilling over structure, questioning itself, liberating me from _______________, or ______________ from me.

It is a canonical addressee of my family’s memory. I gather my mom thinks the picture very adorable, or illustrative of something important. I grew up alongside it, always writhing its way into portrait displays on the walls of every home we lived in.

I was with my aunt and my cousin at African Lion Safari–an open air zoo in Southern Ontario–where we came upon a wet, concrete play park on the grounds. I really loved to swim as a child, however I was ill equipped to do so in this instance; I hadn’t any trunks to change into. My aunt suggested I go swimming in my underwear, and so reluctantly I removed my clothes. I was captured, contemplating my predicament, lounging in horror at the sight of my body. I’m not sure it was this way really, but in my head, the kids watching me were laughing, aghast.

I was listening to a podcast recently that said emotions don’t uncontrollably happen to us. Rather, our emotions are constructed through cultural methods that sculpt our affective responses. At the domestic site, in the presence of such a powerful truth–this photograph–my position on myself must have shifted. What could have faded away absolutely was rehashed over and over again over time. I am now sheepish and uncomfortable, in most clothes and in general. I often feel abject in my body.

Katherine Hubbard once pointed to the ministry of language as if in an attempt to augment its authority over sensation. As an artist dealing with the photographic, I gather Hubbard is concerned with the ethics of capture. Being is slippery and does not wish to sit (nor does it fit easily) inside of the confines of the frame, its invisible cage. A dinosaur toy grows in a glass of water contemplates the plights of containment.
About the artist

 

Lucas Regazzi (b. 1995) is an emerging artist, curator and poet based in Montreal, Quebec. His work has been recently featured in the Haunt Journal of Art at the University of California, Irvine and Montreal-based publication Bad Nudes. Aside from maintaining an artistic and curatorial practice, Lucas is the sitting Art Director for the Void Magazine at Concordia University, and will be receiving his Bachelor’s of Fine Arts in Photography and Art History from the institution in 2018. website twitter instagram

The archive video for “Invitation for bodily being” is now available

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See the archive video

The third installation in Closet Gallery, “Invitation for bodily being” is a floral arrangement, gradually blooming and wilting over the course of the live stream created by Montreal artist Mischa Greig.

While viewing this floral arrangement and installation, viewers are reminded to notice their sensorial experience. “Is it energizing? Quieting? Does it bring you stillness?” The archive footage shares the first and fifth day of the live stream, followed by footage of the arrangement throughout the week following the exhibition.

This project was live steamed October 2-6, 2017 for 24hrs/day.

October in Closet Gallery

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For the October showing in Closet Gallery, Montreal artist Mischa Greig will share a fresh flower arrangement in the closet called Invitation for bodily being.

Invitation for bodily being
2-6 October, 2017

While watching the brief life of these flowers, you are invited to notice your sensations. Can you develop a more corporeal understanding? Can you find empathy?

Our limited sensorial and epistemological systems are inadequate in understanding ourselves and our experience. Cut flowers surpass these boundaries and reveal meaning in the unfamiliar. They become a medium for evoking the peculiar, or the unknown.

By this ‘Art of Noticing’, we can test the heart’s capacity.

This bodily way of being in the world.

Is it energizing? Quieting? Does it bring you stillness?

Hopefully it will deepen your attention to the non-human world, and further to your bodily sensation. To discover or rediscover empathy.

 

Mischa Greig is an anthropologist/florist/artist working in the care sector in Montreal. She joins those disciplines to make sense of symbolic language, relationship, and communication.

The Playlist for “Handle Me” is now Available

 

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See the archive playlist

The second installation in Closet Gallery, “Handle Me” is a multimedia installation created by Montreal artist Hailey Guzik.

A continuation of Guzik’s online persona AvaSlip, this installation transforms AvaSlip’s online internet presence into a physical manifestation, where her character is challenged through material and digital acts of construction and destruction. The deliberate “glitching” of images and objects aims to harness a moment of disruption in order to provide an alternate way of thinking about online personas.

This project was live streamed August 21-25, 2017 from 9am – 6pm ET.

August in Closet Gallery

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For the August showing in Closet Gallery, Montreal artist Hailey Guzik will share a multimedia installation in the closet called Handle Me.

Handle Me
21-25 August, 2017 from 10-6 pm EST

AvaSlip (@gl.tchb.tch) is a concept, not a person. By examining the notion of internet alias’ through the lens of “Glitch Feminism,” she deconstructs the presentation of online bodies. The act of “glitching” serves to fabricate an alternate reality, where conceptions of social media are dissociated from their contemporary uses (communication, self-presentation, etc). This installation transforms AvaSlip’s online internet presence into a physical manifestation, where her character is challenged through material and digital acts of construction and destruction. The deliberate “glitching” of images and objects aims to harness a moment of disruption in order to provide an alternate way of thinking about online personas.

 

Hailey Guzik is a visual artist with maritime roots working in Montreal, QC. Her multidisciplinary practice in painting, drawing, sculpture and video shows an interest in material exploration in relation to individual perceptions of inhabited spaces and surrounding environments. Visit her website here.

The playlist for “work in the gaps of the net” is now available

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See the archive playlist

For the first art showing in Closet Gallery, Montreal artist and Closet Gallery co-founder Lisa Theriault shared a video installation in the closet called work in the gaps of the net.

The performative video was recorded during the summer of 2016. In the video, the performer ties a net dividing her studio space from her living room. Through the veil of the completed net, the performer then sits to “work”, by writing a reflection. This video is played in a loop in the live installation to show a repetitive mental state of preparation and process.

This project was live steamed July 17-21, 2017 from 10-6 pm EST.